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Mumbai
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The city of Bombay originally consisted of seven islands, namely Colaba, Mazagaon, Old Woman's Island, Wadala, Mahim, Parel, and Matunga-Sion. This group of islands, which have since been joined together by a series of reclamations, formed part of the kingdom of Ashoka, the famous Emperor of India

Mumbai is located on Salsette Island which lies at the mouth of Ulhas River off the western coast of India in the coastal region known as the Konkan. Most of Mumbai is at sea level and the average elevation ranges from 10 to 15 metres. The northern part of Mumbai is hilly and the highest point of the city is at 450 metres (1,450 feet). Mumbai spans a total area of 468 km (169 square miles).

Three lakes are located within the metropolitan limits the Tulsi Lake, Vihar Lake and the Powai Lake. The first two are located within the Borivali National Park and supply part of the city's drinking water. Mumbai also has three small rivers within the city limits originating in the National Park. The coastline of the city is indented with numerous creeks and bays. On the eastern seaboard, large mangrove swamps rich in biodiversity occupy most of the region.

Although the archipelago which developed into the modern city of Mumbai was inhabited whenever history chanced on it, we are forced to imagine the lives of these early Mumbaikars, because the islands lay outside of the sweep of history and beyond the marches of armies for millennia. Stone age implements have been found at several sites in these islands. Later, around the third century BC, the coastal regions, and presumably the islands, were part of the Magadhan empire ruled by the emperor Ashok. The empire ebbed, leaving behind some Buddhist monks and the deep-sea fishermen called Kolis, whose stone goddess, Mumbadevi, gave her name to the modern metropolis

Economy The Bombay Stock Exchange index reflects investor confidence in the economy of India.Mumbai contributes 10% of all factory employment, 40% of all income tax collections, 60% of all customs duty collections, 20% of all central excise tax collections, 40% of India's foreign trade and Rupees 40 billion (US$ 9 billion) in corporate taxes[6]. A number of Indian financial institutions have headquarters in downtown Mumbai, including the Bombay Stock Exchange, the Reserve Bank of India, the National Stock Exchange of India, the Mint, and numerous conglomerates (the Tata Group, Godrej and Reliance etc). Many foreign banks and financial institutions also have branches in this area.

Up until the 1980s, Mumbai owed its prosperity largely to textile mills and the seaport, but the local economy has since been diversified to include engineering, diamond polishing, healthcare and information technology. Mumbais status as the state capital means that state and federal government employees make up a large percentage of the city's workforce. Mumbai also has a large unskilled and semi-skilled labour population, who primarily earn their livelihood as hawkers, taxi drivers, mechanics and other such blue collar professions. The port and shipping industry too employs many residents, directly or indirectly.

The entertainment industry is the other major employer in Mumbai. Most of India's major television and satellite networks are headquartered in Mumbai, as well as its major publishing houses. The centre of the Hindi movie industry, Bollywood, is also located in Mumbai, along with its largest studios and movie production houses.

Mumbai is the business & financial capital of India. All the major financial institutions, banks and stock exchanges are based in Mumbai. The head quarters or administrative offices of major business houses operate out of Mumbai.

The earlier business district of Ballard Estate have given way to Nariman Point in South Mumbai and more recently to the new business districts, which have come up in Bandra Kurla complex and the Lower Parel areas, which are being built on redeveloped textile mills' land.

Newer business complexes are coming up in Andheri and other districts in the northern part of the city. These units mostly house the IT and knowledge based industries e.g. BPOs. Gradually the smokestack industry is being driven out of Mumbai, mainly due to economic unviability.

Climate The climate of the city, being in the tropical zone, and near the Arabian Sea, may be broadly classified into two main seasons the humid season, and the dry season. The humid season, between March and October, is characterised by high humidity and temperatures of over 30 C (86 F). The monsoon rains lash the city between June to September, and supply most of the city's annual rainfall of 2,200 mm (85 in). The maximum annual rainfall ever recorded was 3,452 mm (135.89 in) in 1954[5]. The highest rainfall recorded in a single day was 944 mm (37.16 in) on 2005-07-26.

The dry season, between November and February, is characterised by moderate levels of humidity and warm to cool weather. Cold northerly winds are responsible for a mild chill during January and February. Annual temperatures range from a high of 38 C (100 F) to a low of 11 C (52 F). The record high is 43 C (108 F) and record low is 7.4 C (45 F) on 1962-01-22.


Apparel Cities
(Click the city names to view details)
 Ahmedabad  Alleppey  Badrinath  Bangalore  Belgaum
 Bhopal  Cannanore  Chennai  Coimbatore  Columbia
 Delhi  Erode  Fatehpur Sikri  Hyderabad  Indore
 Jaipur  Kanchipuram  Kanpur  Karur  Kochi
 Kolkatta  Kollam  Lucknow  Ludhiana  Madurai
 Mumbai  Nagpur  New Delhi  Pune  Rishikesh
 Salem  Srikakulam  Surat  Tirupati  Tirupur
 Trichy  Trivandrum  Vadodara  Varnasi  Warangal

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